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Home / The Perennial Test Kitchen / How to Par-Cook Kernza®
How to Par-Cook Kernza®

How to Par-Cook Kernza®

Kernza is extremely versatile. Not only can it act as a substitute for most grains in any given recipe, the fact that it has an outstanding flavor/aroma will give the dish you’re preparing much more depth. To add to this versatility, Kernza can be “par-cooked” ahead of time with just water and a little salt. With the par-cooked grain in your arsenal, all one needs to do is add any combination of veggies, proteins, or seasonings on hand (think left-overs), and enjoy as a chilled salad or heated as a quick stir fry.

The grain itself is fairly resilient, and can easily handle a second heating. It pairs well with harder spices such as cinnamon, allspice, clove, etc. along with honey, brown sugar, and brown butter, but it is by no means limited to that profile. There really is no limit as to what Kernza works well with!

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    5 comments

    Apr 29, 2022 • Posted by JTE

    For all the pressure-cooker cooks out there, whole kerza cooks perfectly without any pre-soaking with 20 minutes of pressure cooking. My ratio is 1.5 water to 1 kernza, plus 1+ Tbl of olive oil. Bring to pressure, cook at pressure for 20 minutes, natural release of pressure (meaning, just take the pot off the heat and let it sit until the pressure releases by itself). This is for near sea level. High altitudes might be a little different.

    Mar 28, 2022 • Posted by Linda Watson

    @ Martha, the ingredients are in the left column: 1 cup grain to 1.5 cup water. I missed it at first too.

    Oct 19, 2021 • Posted by Rodney

    Looking for a recipe using Kernza to make a pumpernickle like bread.
    Thank you.

    Oct 14, 2021 • Posted by Martha J Hewett

    Nevermind – I see it in the blue box. ;-}

    Oct 14, 2021 • Posted by Martha J Hewett

    This says to use 1 1/2 c of water, but it doesn’t say how much uncooked Kernza to start with. Can you clarify that?

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